Scolibri boosts connections between teachers and students with school-wide educational network

scolibri-logoTeaching can be a pretty rewarding experience if you are able to positively impact the lives of your students and push them towards great achievements, but it can also be stressful and there are many challenges. Berlin-based Scolibri aims to helps teachers and school administrators by establishing a network to simplify interaction between students and teachers and, ideally, make the learning experience more worthwhile for students who come through the system.

The inspiration for the company came to Lukas Wandzioch a few years ago when he interned at a school and personally witnessed problems in the way teachers interacted with their students. Tobias Hoenig from Scolibri told Wired that Wandzioch actually came up with the idea for his own platform after experiencing disappointment while trying out now-competitor Moodle.

Ultimately, Scolibri wants to take over the way that the entire school is managed. For teachers, administrators, and students, the platform provides a means to message one another, share notes, access important calendar listings, and more. Hoenig says that they are working to develop their own Dropbox-like platform, which should offer increased security.

Scolibri is definitely not cheap, as the platform costs 5,000 Euro to use, but the cost does not need to be born by just one person. Hoenig tells me that the company picks up customers when enough teachers at a particular school express interest in the product. If there is sufficient interest, they will go in and make arrangements to set the system up. To date, Hoenig says that they have 3,000 users from 50 schools in Germany.

Scolibri launched last year and has been in beta since January. The team behind Scolibri has bootstrapped the project to this point, but Hoenig says that they will look to obtain 100K Euro through crowdfunding in the near future. They are also talking with investors, but this is nothing to report on that front at the moment.

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